Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think (49 page)

Ola has received several awards for his work at Gapminder, including a Résumé Super-communicator Award and the Guld
ä
gget Titanpriset in 2017 and the Niras International Integrated Development Prize in 2016.

Ola is married to Anna Rosling R
ö
nnlund. They have three children: Max, Ted, and Ebba.

Anna Rosling R
ö
nnlund

Anna was born in Falun, Sweden, in 1975. She holds degrees in sociology from Lund University and photography from Gothenburg University and is a cofounder and vice president of the Gapminder Foundation.

Anna is a lecturer and the guardian of the end user at Gapminder, making sure that everything Gapminder does is easy to understand. Together with Ola, Anna directed Hans’s TED talks and other lectures, developed the Gapminder graphics and slides, and designed the user interface of the animated bubble-chart tool Trendalyzer. When the tool was acquired by Google in 2007, she went to work for Google as a senior usability designer. In 2010, Anna returned to Gapminder to develop new free teaching materials.

Dollar Street, launched in 2016, is Anna’s brainchild and the subject of her 2017 TED talk.

Anna has won several awards for her work at Gapminder, including a R
é
sum
é
Super-communicator Award, the Guld
ä
gget Titanpriset, and the Fast Company World Changing Ideas Award in 2017.

Anna is married to Ola Rosling. They have three children: Max, Ted, and Ebba.

FOOTNOTES

Chapter One: The Gap Instinct

1
Of course, if you live on Level 4 and have relatives living on Levels 2 or 3, you probably know what their lives look like. If so, you can skip this section.

Chapter Two: The Negativity Instinct

1
You can track the progress of your country—or any country—using the freely available tool we use to create our bubble charts, found at www.gapminder.org/tools.

Chapter Six: The Generalization Instinct

1
Visit Dollar Street here:
www.dollarstreet.org
.

Appendix: How Did Your Country Do?

1
South Korea and Japan actually beat the chimps on this question. We don’t know why yet. It could have to do with the skewed age structures in these countries. It could be that the fall in the birth rate is discussed more there than elsewhere. We have some more work to do to understand this.

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